Career Self-Promotion With Elegance & Style

Recently Kim Skarupski, Assistant Dean for Faculty Development, (pictured below) stopped by the Welch Journal Club to speak about “Graceful Self-Promotion.” 

Her presentation was informative and quite revealing. Dean Skarupski posed many questions that most of us struggle with on a daily basis. For instance, how many of us are caught attempting to balance confidence and humility? How many of us, so as not to appear braggadocious, opt to apply a humble spin on our contributions and achievements? Instead, we quickly substitute “humblebragging” (below) as a disguise to our true intentions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All too often, we underestimate or underplay our achievements so as not to assume the role of biggest ego in the room. Among the many suggestions Dean Skarupski put forth was balancing “I’” with “We,” and “leaving a positive memory” with your peers. What better way to promote your own scholarship than to leave a verbal calling card that refreshes your contributions. Show how you tackled a problem with action and achieved a favorable result. Dean Skarupski also emphasized how your physical presence in the workplace can say so much about who you are. 

 

 

No, we can’t all leap from tall buildings in a single bound. However, with good body language let’s show how positive we feel about ourselves, and how welcoming we are to conversation and social engagement. Adapt a powerful inward and outward projection. Look the part. Don’t project to others how “small” you may feel in someone's presence. Let your body be a projection of your true worth and value. The leaping and bounding may never come, but that shouldn’t stop you from being the Superhero in your own life.

Develop an “elevator speech” that informs your audience about the most recent developments to spring up in your world. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above, we see an example of the elements behind the WRONG elevator pitch (lack of eye contact, lack of physical engagement ---do these two even know each other?). Make sure your elevator pitch is something that’s crafted to highlight the “valuable-ness” of you.

REMEMBER! You’re not bragging, you’re updating. You may encounter a great many people in the course of your day, and the least you can do is leave everyone you “touch” with a positive experience. And if you receive a compliment or two, a simple “thank you” will suffice. No need to downgrade someone’s acknowledgement with “oh, it was just luck,” or “Well, I guess things turned out alright.” Be willing to take the compliment and show your appreciation. There’s no need to belittle your contributions. And, if you’re still feeling a little ambiguous about handling self-promotion without going overboard, perhaps this can help.

 

 

Now, let’s all get out there and fly.

 

The Welch Library Communications Team

 


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