Fake Medicine Gets A Global Pass

 

Reading this very detailed exploration into the "success" of false and/or substandard medicine on a global scope, can easily provide conclusions that arrive in one of several directions. The authors provide award-winning definitions between "false medicine" as opposed to "substandard medicine". False medicine is shrouded with a criminal intent. Substandard medicine wallows in the negligent "oops I made a boo-boo" territory. They also include global initiatives to improve the bureaucratic labyrinth that surrounds the entire quagmire. However, one of the key passages reveals that at the heart of this medical monkeywrench are the role governments play as they tend to value the protection of intellectual property and commercial elements that attach themselves to the application of good medicine. 

But land mines dot the landscape. If a country, an individual, a governing body chooses to allow bad meds into their country, and let's say just the worse case scenario is: someone dies. Do some mealy-mouthed "regulatory violations" do justice to this activity? Or imagine the perhaps even foggier circumstances behind a "civil negligence claim?" Yes, we might make a Sundance Indie movie about such a hero or heroine who tackled this system, but alas, the rest of the world may not have such an option.

By no means should we draw conclusions with convenient David-and-Goliath paint-by-the-numbers colors. But as you delve further into the article, the breath and scope of the corruption behind the issue of good medicine on an international level is, to say the least, quite VIVID.      

 

Alonzo LaMont

alonzo@jhmi.edu


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